Can You Have Colored Or Dyed Hair On A Golf Course?

colored dyed hair

Whenever you have watched professional golfers playing golf in the past, you may have never seen one sporting colored hair.

Therefore, you may be wondering, why do you not see professional golfers with colored hair? Are professional golfers even allowed to have colored hair?

In this article, we will answer these questions and tell you exactly why golfers usually do not have colored hair, as well as whether they are allowed to have colored hair.

Can You Have Colored Hair On A Golf Course?

Yes, professional golfers are allowed to have colored hair. There are no rules in the PGA Rulebook preventing players from changing their hair color. The PGA dress codes instead focuses on the clothes golfers can and cannot wear.

There are no rules in the PGA Rulebook that specifically discriminate against colored hair, tattoos, body modifications such as piercings, and others.

Technically, you can have any hair color you want on your head if you are playing on the PGA Tour. However, make sure to be ready to get some weird looks thrown your way if you decide to break out of the mold.

Locally, some snobbish golf clubs in your area may or may not kick you out for having odd colored hair… However, in most cases, you should be good to wear any hair color you want. If you want to be sure, ask your local golf club before dying your hair.

Why Do Professional Golfers Not Have Colored Hair?

The main thing to remember here is that there is a relatively small who have colored hair, but you might just not know it.

In fact, according to the PGA Tour Dress Code Rules, there is no ban on colored hair for professional golf players.

The Dress Code holds the list of clothes professional golfers are allowed and prohibited from wearing. Generally, the PGA Tour Dress Code tends to avoid allowing golfers to wear clothes that show lots of skin.

PGA Tour players need to look presentable for the image of the sport of golf and for the cameras as the game is being televised worldwide. The PGA does not want to lose the image that golf is a classy, elegant sport.

Another reason why golf players might not have colored hair, despite it being allowed, is that golf is known as an elegant, upper class sport.

Colored hair carries a bit of a wild, unconventional, crazy & potentially lunatic kind of connotation, so golf players may avoid odd hair colors for fear of not being accepted into golf communities, despite there not really being anything wrong with it.

To illustrate this point, it is much more likely you will find colored hair in a group of hippies on strike than on a golfer, simply because of society’s expectations of what the image of a golfer represents.

How Will People React To My Colored Hair On A Golf Course?

Like with almost everything in life, there will be mixed reactions.

Younger folks may compliment, or see no issue with your colored hair, and brush them off as personal expression, or not even notice them. On the other hand, old scrooges may give you a mean look for “not respecting the image of golf”.

Whatever the reaction is, you are allowed to have all the hair color you want, even if pink, although you need to be mindful that our appearances do cause prejudice and generate emotions in others.

If you do not wish to ever be mistaken for someone crazy and politically-extremist, you may want to avoid colored hair. On the other hand, for some people, colored hair is a form of art and expression that can make them feel like they stand out. If you have colored hair, own it.

No one should make you feel like you are less worthy as a golf player just because you have colored hair; that is discrimination. The perfect “image” of a golfer is nothing more than a golden boy ideal; you do not need to model yourself after that. However, if you want to model yourself after that, that is awesome too.

If you are still not convinced that a few extra pigments of ink inside of your hair do not make you a worse golfer, look to some of the professional PGA Tour golfers that have colored hair, such as:

Brooks Koepka
Michelle Wie
Ian Poulter
Ana Belac
Sharmina Nicollet

All these golf players listed above have had dyed hair and are professional golf players that likely outrank anyone that could ever badmouth you on a golf course for having dyed hair.

The existence of these colored hair players should prove to your subconscious mind that there is absolutely nothing wrong with being a golf player with dyed hair, and that your performances will absolutely not suffer from having dyed hair.

Believe in yourself, and own every part of you that you cannot improve or that you intentionally designed.

Conclusion

There you go! After reading this article, you have learned whether professional golfers can have colored or dyed hair in the PGA, and why more golfers are not rocking dyed hair.

This article went over the PGA Tour rulings on colored hair, the specific reasons why more golfers do not dye their hair, as well as how other people will view your dyed hair while you are on the golf course.

Do you like colored hair on golfers? Does dyed hair break the elegance of golf? Let us know in the comments down below!